ode to a mother tongue, lost & long forgotten 

wewereajigsaw:

when my grandfather died       my father made me swear
      on his grave
   i would never forget
       the language of my birth.

              i was 4     so
    suffice to say
       the litany of my lifelong disappointments
begins early.

because you see i was born under a different sky with
a different set of teeth, a tongue
they called too    clu m
                             s
                                y
  to ever make for
            poetry

and by the time i learned
that a lithp
   is just a lithp
      and not a mark against the art that
              ran over/through me
        i’d long since burned
      my mother tongue away.

but still   i
    was 
        proud, proud of my will, the strength of my resolve,
   the untraceability of my
pan-pacific zero-accountability accent neutrality,
race: blank
proud to be rootless,  to be fearless, to be 
     anyone

and not knowing, then, that
no matter how many languages i   f o rg e    t
    i’ll never scrub away this gunpowder ash, this
         five-thousand-year history                ere are ya from?
         coursing through my blood&bones,
because they told me

"blood is blood"              or i just didn’t want to hear

but they never fucking said how much it hurts
to be living in a flash-flood tearaway world without corners in fear of
being carried/washed away, a world without handholds (a lost cause),
how living with no roots is a tightrope act over a stranger’s soil that you
       pretend to call 
       h o m e

&
 

                               how lonely it gets

                                       (how very)   .
                                 

i never managed to drop
that trace of
   foreign           (  xenos  )
          from my lungs,                  
                                  born and raised ha h a
 and now this sharp                   
&broken language cuts   
                        m e
              with it’s edges knowing
i’ll never write poetry
my mother understands.


 
poetry   

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Villa Vals

Architects CMA and SeARCH were focusing on the question if it would be possible to conceal a house in an Alpine slope while still exploiting the wonderful views and allowing light to enter the building when planing the Villa Vals. They decided to build a central patio into the steep incline to create a large facade with considerable potential for window openings. The viewing angle from the building is slightly inclined, giving a dramatic view of the beautiful mountains on the opposite side of the narrow valley.

All images © Iwan Baan


Samson
Regina Spektor

You are my sweetest downfall
I loved you first, I loved you first…


i-march-mello:

danim4ux:

THE SHEET IS MADE OUT OF WOOD TOO
Wendell Castle, Ghost Clock. 1985

THAT IS MAHOGANY

i-march-mello:

danim4ux:

THE SHEET IS MADE OUT OF WOOD TOO

Wendell Castle, Ghost Clock. 1985

THAT IS MAHOGANY


Truancy | Delinquent's Spice 

medievalpoc:

shwetanarayan:

jhameia:

opalinkwell:

medievalpoc:

DS is proud to announce a brand new venue for fiction based off one or more fairytale revision. Truancy, as the name suggests, allows for less conventional folk and fairytale retellings. Perhaps “retellings” is too specific a word. I want ambitious short fiction pieces, I want people to consider not just unusual folk or fairytales to retell. I want them to create their own fairytales.

This is guided by the same ethos as Delinquent’s Spice. I want stories from the planet that aren’t hegemonic or caught up with imperialism. I realise there’s a dearth of such venues and we need new venues for short stories that build off folklore and fairytale. The difference is that Truancy stories won’t be connected by prompts, and this allows me to give writers more freedom.

Here are the general guidelines:

1. Short fiction, between 2000-3500 words would be ideal but the hard limit is 4000 words. Payment is a flat rate of USD10 per story.
2. Prose poems, stream-of-consciousness and experimental prose are all welcome in this venue. It’s called Truancy for a reason, you know? Here you get to play.
3. There may occasionally be themed issues and guest editors in the future. When this happens, specific sets of guidelines will be released.
4. The emphasis remains on marginalised voices that are strong, bold, playful and experimental.
a.I want WoC/PoC/QUILTBAG writers. This is also a disability-friendly venue. I want lesser represented, non-Anglophone cultures. I will be happy with non-neurotypical/neurodiverse characters/writers. Non-binary writers are also most welcome.
b. Although the stories accepted in this venue should be primarily written in English, I also accept Englishes, and excerpts and dialogues in other languages, so long as the meaning is self-explanatory (this is important because we don’t want your story to be clogged up with an overload of exposition. That will obscure the story AND your voice).
c. I want stories that shine with dialect, with pidgin, with improvision, with beat, and meter. Let’s shake things up here, let’s be truant, let’s start a fairytale riot.Let’s get rid of that misconception that fairytales and folktales are for the twee, and that they’re no longer relevant. We need them for every age.
4. Do read the general guidelines for Delinquent Spice in regards to inclusiveness, diversity and appropriation. They apply to Truancy as well. This is very important. Do not give me stories that demonise any minority, displays racism, ableism, misogyny and stereotypes.
5. While I use the Aarne-Thompson-Uther (ATU) specifications for Volume One of Delinquent’s Spice, they are by no means the be-all and end-all for folk and fairytales (the systems-obsessed nerd in me does like the elegant simplicity of the categories, but that’s par for the course).
a. Therefore, do look deeper into the treasures of your respective cultures to find these stories. They may exist in children’s books or in a different language. Urban legends are fine too.
b. Do let me know in your cover letter about the fairytale or tale-type you’re referencing. If there’s no available translation in English, just give me the gist of the story! If you’re making it up as you go along but messing around with fairytale/folktale tropes, do let me know as well.
6. Please read the general guidelines here for very essential requirements for both DS pubs. The submissions email address is there too with formatting instructions!

Reblogging for my readers who write!

As much as I’d love to promote this, $10 for 2500 words is $0.004 per word, roughly $2 per page.  Five pages of work that could take you anywhere from two to five hours.  That is extremely below even the federal minimum wage. 

Writers, your work is worth so much more than this.  Just as artists deserve to be paid a fair wage for their work, so do we writers. 

I see WAY too much of this, and things like this, where writers are expected to work for free, for “exposure”, or for the absolute bare minimum.  People want to make a living off of their hard work.  Stop acting like writing is easy and cheap.

FYI, the WOC publisher/editor is doing this completely out of her own private pocket, without any eye to profit-making. 

It would be so nice if we could all start zines with enough capital to pay our authors a competitive, professional rate at all times. Especially zines that are specifically for queer writers of colour. 

Signal boost! And, bolding mine.

Yes, I agree, authors deserve payment for work. But yes, also, that’s often a HUGE barrier that stops marginalized people from editing fiction. (And seriously even the pro markets don’t pay us anything like minimum wage, why does that particular measure only come out when the editor is a WOC, I wonder?)

So, yeah, this is not a pro-paying market, it’s still a worthwhile market for many of us. 

^^^


 

"In Greek, whose color lexicon did not stabilize for many centuries, the words most commonly used for blue are glaukos and kyaneos. The latter probably referred originally to a mineral or a metal; it has a foreign root and its meaning often shifted. During the Homeric period it denoted both the bright blue of the iris and the black of funeral garments, but never the blue of the sky or sea. An analysis of Homer’s poetry shows that out of sixty adjectives describing elements and landscapes in the Iliad and Odyssey, only three are color terms, while those evoking light effects are quite numerous. During the classical era, kyaneos meant a dark color: deep blue, violet, brown, and black. In fact, it evokes more the “feeling” of the color than its actual hue. The term glaukos, which existed in the Archaic period and was much used by Homer, can refer to gray, blue, and sometimes even yellow or brown. Rather than denoting a particular color, it expresses the idea of a color’s feebleness or weak concentration. For this reason it is used to describe the color of water, eyes, leaves, or honey."

Michel Pastoureau, Blue: The History of a Color

 
winterbcky:

writing: suspense ;; an instrumental mix

perihelion - trent reznor & atticus ross // descent - austin wintory // oxymorons - alexandre desplat // rain - marco beltrami // use and abuse part 1 - andrew hale // obelisk - timber timbre // legions (war) - zoe keating // in chaos eternal - atrium carceri // great bird of prey - trent reznor & atticus ross // the void - steven price // the tale of the three brothers - alexandre desplat // constellations - balmorhea // i’m goblin - hans zimmer and the magnificent six // interrogation - the chemical brothers

winterbcky:

writing: suspense ;; an instrumental mix

perihelion - trent reznor & atticus ross // descent - austin wintory // oxymorons - alexandre desplat // rain - marco beltrami // use and abuse part 1 - andrew hale // obelisk - timber timbre // legions (war) - zoe keating // in chaos eternal - atrium carceri // great bird of prey - trent reznor & atticus ross // the void - steven price // the tale of the three brothers - alexandre desplat // constellations - balmorhea // i’m goblin - hans zimmer and the magnificent six // interrogation - the chemical brothers


 

Edna St. Vincent Millay was the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for poetry. She was openly bisexual and had affairs with other women and married men. When she finally married, hers was an open marriage. Her 1920 poetry collection A Few Figs From Thistles drew controversy for its novel exploration of female sexuality. She was one of the earliest and strongest voices for what became known as feminism. One of the recurring themes of her poetry was that men might use her body, but not possess her or have any claim over her. (x)

Edna St. Vincent Millay was the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for poetry. She was openly bisexual and had affairs with other women and married men. When she finally married, hers was an open marriage. Her 1920 poetry collection A Few Figs From Thistles drew controversy for its novel exploration of female sexuality. She was one of the earliest and strongest voices for what became known as feminism. One of the recurring themes of her poetry was that men might use her body, but not possess her or have any claim over her. (x)