Diversity in Writing 

elloellenoh:

I did this post for Write on Com. Figured it would be worth sharing here also.

Diversity in Writing

by author Ellen Oh

Recently, I was part of a conversation where an author said the following: “But there’s been a lot of anger from some quarters about “appropriation” and…


 

allinablur:

Portuguese history meme — seven places/buildings [3/7]

Park and National Palace of Pena

Located in the Sintra hills, the Park and Palace of Pena are the fruit of King consort Ferdinand II’s creative genius and the greatest expression of 19th-century romanticism in Portugal, denoting clear influences from the Manueline and Moorish styles of architecture. In 2013, it was the most visited monument in Portugal.

In 1838, King Ferdinand II acquired the former Hieronymite monastery of Our Lady of Pena, which had been built by King Manuel I in 1511 on the top of the hill above Sintra and had been left unoccupied since 1834 (suppression of the religious orders). The monastery consisted of the cloister and its outbuildings, the chapel, the sacristy and the bell tower, which today form the northern section of the Palace (the Old Palace).

King Ferdinand began by making repairs to the former monastery, which was in very bad condition. In roughly 1843, the king decided to enlarge the palace by building a new wing (the New Palace). The building work was directed by the Baron of Eschwege. The 1994 repair works restored the original colours of the Palace’s exterior: pink for the former monastery and ochre for the New Palace.

In transforming a former monastery into a castle-like residence, King Ferdinand showed that he was heavily influenced by German romanticism, and that he probably found his inspiration in the Stolzenfels and Rheinstein castles on the banks of the Rhine, as well as Babelsberg Palace in Potsdam. These building works ended in the mid-1860s, although further work was undertaken at later dates for the decoration of the interiors.

King Ferdinand also ordered the Park of Pena to be planted in the Palace’s surrounding areas in the style of the romantic gardens of that time, with winding paths, pavilions and stone benches placed at different points along its routes, as well as trees and other plants originating from the four corners of the earth. In this way, the king took advantage of the mild and damp climate of the Sintra hills to create an entirely new and exotic park with over five hundred different species of trees.

The Palace of Pena was designated a National Monument in 1910 and forms part of the Cultural Landscape of Sintra, which has been classified by UNESCO as World Heritage since 1995. In 2013, the Palace was integrated into the Network of European Royal Residences. [x] [x]

photos: x/ x/ x/ x/ x/ x/; the last one is mine.


 
white people CANNOT join hinduism. in order to practice hinduism, you have to be born Hindi.

youarenotdesi:

dorothyparkerwashere:

Huh? Erm, yeah okay let’s talk about this. Indian Hindu girl here with a depth of knowledge of Hinduism (philosophical and daily practice.) 

A) It’s HindU, not Hindi. Hindi is a language, and is not even the language of Hinduism, which is Sanskrit. (By this I mean the language the Vedas and other ancient texts are written in. In South India, prayers can be said in Tamil, Kannada, Telugu etc so it doesn’t mean you can’t pray in your language.) 

B) Technically, yes you can’t convert. There is a reason for this. It’s not cos we be mean. It’s cos in Hinduism there is a concept of Dharma, and part of that concept is the idea that everyone has a duty to do, a role to play. To convert someone, either forcibly or through preaching, is to take them away from their Dharma. When they come to a religion on their own, that is their Dharma. It is not up to us to preach to people about religion. That’s why Hinduism has no concept of proselytizing or conversion. There is no conversion process. 

Now you’re asking “what about all those White people who convert to Hinduism?” Okay, ISKCON, or Krishna Consciousness, is what most White people convert too. ISKCON tries to pass itself off as part of Hinduism because that gives it legitimacy (and Hindus being kinda whatever about what other people believe as long as you don’t kill us for it tend to just let it be). But ISKCON’s beliefs are not in line with what Hindus believe. ISKCON appeals to White people because of it’s exotification of Asian religion which is then mixed with Protestant culture. Hence, with ISKCON, you get concepts like going to heaven (which Hindus don’t believe in) and conversion. So yes White people can’t join Hinduism, but really it’s cos when you define it the way you do other religions no one can. 

C) Does this mean no matter how much you love Hinduism and believe in it you will never be Hindu cos u can’t convert? No, actually it does not. See, Hinduism is both practice and a way of life. Philosophically, a belief that we are all God or have the God particle in us, that all life forms are connected to Brahman or a universal energy, and that our actions or karma leads to rebirth is quite enough to be Hindu. The Vedas tell you the traditions and customs you need to live this life, but the Upanishads than make a philosophical critique of what has come before. The Upanishads understand that people need the rituals and the forms of god with human faces and characteristics because that is the God many of us can relate to and love, but God in its truest form is oneness inside all of us, that connects all of us, and when we realize this, we don’t need to see God in other forms because we see him (it) in us and everyone, all around us. 

You do not need to convert to realize this. You do not need to know a word of Sanskrit to realize this. You do not need to utter the mantras or sing to him (it) to realize this. Not being able to do all this doesn’t make you any less of a Hindu. You do not even need to necessarily identify as Hindu to be Hindu. (We’re perfectly okay with this. No issues at all. Your identity is yours and yours alone.) 

You do not need some priest, holy water and a conversion process for you to join some sect or group in order to understand and realize you are a part of God. You already are. How can you convert into something which is already you? 

And this is why you can’t convert to Hinduism. 

I actually really like this explanation.  Take special note of the ISKCON explanation - it’s spot on.


 
religion   


 

Writing Research - Victorian Era 

ghostflowerdreams:

In historical fiction it is important to be accurate and the only way to do so is to research the era. What is highly recommended by many writers is to write your story first. While writing your story, mark the parts that you’re not sure are correct and then do the research after you are done. This is to prevent you from from doing unnecessary research that may not be relevant to your work. You want to spend your time wisely!

To begin, the Victorian period formally begins in 1837 (the year Victoria became Queen) and ends in 1901 (the year of her death). 

Names

Society & Life

Commerce

Entertainment & Food

Hygiene, Health & Medicine

Fashion

Dialogue

Justice & Crimes


 
reference   

charminglyantiquated:

a little love story about mermaids and tattoos


myth   

fbimom:

i want her - A mix for explicitly lesbian songs (because I’m tired of lesbian mixes filled with vague songs sung by girls)

1. jenny / studio killers 2. i want her / georgia harris 3. i’m not gonna teach your boyfriend how to dance with you / kate nash 4. girls/girls/boys / her electric fur 5. the girl / emma taylor 6. jezebel / sara garrison 7. sweater weather / kina grannis 8. i kissed a girl / katy perry 9. don’t do boys / elektra 10. dirty king / the cliks 11. ode to janey lou / foe 12. long brown hair / regina spektor

fbimom:

i want her - A mix for explicitly lesbian songs (because I’m tired of lesbian mixes filled with vague songs sung by girls)

1. jenny / studio killers 2. i want her / georgia harris 3. i’m not gonna teach your boyfriend how to dance with you / kate nash 4. girls/girls/boys / her electric fur 5. the girl / emma taylor 6. jezebel / sara garrison 7. sweater weather / kina grannis 8. i kissed a girl / katy perry 9. don’t do boys / elektra 10. dirty king / the cliks 11. ode to janey lou / foe 12. long brown hair / regina spektor


mixes   

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.


 

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED

I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!

Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!

Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  

And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway

An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.

Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.


 
softerworld:

A Softer World: 911
(it isn’t the storm that makes the ocean dangerous.)
buy this print

softerworld:

A Softer World: 911

(it isn’t the storm that makes the ocean dangerous.)

buy this print