fbimom:

i want her - A mix for explicitly lesbian songs (because I’m tired of lesbian mixes filled with vague songs sung by girls)

1. jenny / studio killers 2. i want her / georgia harris 3. i’m not gonna teach your boyfriend how to dance with you / kate nash 4. girls/girls/boys / her electric fur 5. the girl / emma taylor 6. jezebel / sara garrison 7. sweater weather / kina grannis 8. i kissed a girl / katy perry 9. don’t do boys / elektra 10. dirty king / the cliks 11. ode to janey lou / foe 12. long brown hair / regina spektor

fbimom:

i want her - A mix for explicitly lesbian songs (because I’m tired of lesbian mixes filled with vague songs sung by girls)

1. jenny / studio killers 2. i want her / georgia harris 3. i’m not gonna teach your boyfriend how to dance with you / kate nash 4. girls/girls/boys / her electric fur 5. the girl / emma taylor 6. jezebel / sara garrison 7. sweater weather / kina grannis 8. i kissed a girl / katy perry 9. don’t do boys / elektra 10. dirty king / the cliks 11. ode to janey lou / foe 12. long brown hair / regina spektor


mixes   

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.


 

teacup-warrior:

philipchircop:

ENGOLDENED

I learnt a new word and I love the sound of it: kintsukuroi. It is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with seams of gold. Kintsugi repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the container even more beautiful than it was prior to being broken.  Not a very common idea in western culture!

Instead of diminishing the bowl’s appeal and appreciation, the “break” offers the container  a new sense of its vitality and resilience. The bowl has become more beautiful for having been broken. One can say that the true life of the bowl began the moment it was dropped!

Imagine you are that clay pot: celebrate your flaws and imperfections. Remember that you being you is what makes you uniquely beautiful.  

And remember: “The world breaks everyone, then some become strong at the broken places.” Ernest Hemingway

An interesting essay on the art of kintsukuroi can be found in Flickwerk, The Aesthetics of Mended Japanese Ceramics.

Photos source | Kintsugi Japan

I’m pretty sure that I’ve reblogged this before, but its actually one of my favorite posts on tumblr. The idea that something can be more beautiful after being broken is so moving to me. I kind of want one of these someday, or to make my own. It’s an amazing concept, and I love the fact that it’s an artform.


 
softerworld:

A Softer World: 911
(it isn’t the storm that makes the ocean dangerous.)
buy this print

softerworld:

A Softer World: 911

(it isn’t the storm that makes the ocean dangerous.)

buy this print


 

lohrien:

Illustrations by Ola Liola website l tumblr l shop


 

characterdesigninspiration:

Quite a few people requested some form of trait/personality generator, and here’s the result!  I wanted to keep it vague enough that the options could work for any universe, be it modern, fantasy, scifi, or anything else, so these are really just the basics. Remember that a character is much more than a list of traits, and this should only be used as a starting point– I tried to include a variety of things, but further development is definitely a must.

Could pair well with the gender and sexuality generator.

To Play: Click and drag each gif, or if that isn’t working/you’re on mobile, just take a screenshot of the whole thing (multiple screenshots may be required if you want more than one trait from each category).


Bucky Barnes and dating in the 40’s.  

buckycamehome:

So, wow.  Yeah.  Another one of those “I’ve been reading a lot of.. and.. (insert my opinion here).”

So, yes,  I keep reading about Bucky as the ladies man: all sexed up and such.  It’s a bit baffling to me, as this is a very modern way of thinking.  Dating - or courtship - was very different in the 30’s and 40’s than it is today!

For example, take this excerpt from A Brief History of Courtship and Dating in America, (Part 2):

Beth Bailey and Ken Myers explain in the Mars Hill Audio ReportWandering Toward the Altar: The Decline of American Courtship, before World War II, American youth prized what Bailey calls a promiscuous popularity, demonstrated through the number and variety of dates a young adult could command, sometimes even on the same night.

In the late 1940s, Margaret Mead, in describing this pre-war dating system, argued that dating was not about sex or marriage. Instead, it was a “competitive game,” a way for girls and boys to demonstrate their popularity.

This describes a situation in which dating was more about one’s reputation than any sort of romance.  It was very important not only to be seen with many dates, but with the proper people.  This explains why Steve would have had such a difficult time securing a partner: being seen with someone unpopular was worse than not being seen at all.  However, this gives us a clue as to how popular Bucky must have been!  If he was able to leverage himself in order to get Steve dates, Bucky must have been pretty high-ranking on the dating scale.

For men, desirable dating traits included a good personality and dance skills, as well as being “tactful, amusing, well dressed, prompt, and courteous” (Great Depression and the Middle Class…).  Lasciviousness was not a good quality!  Women communicated with one another concerning a man’s suitability, so for Bucky to have been popular he couldn’t have been the sex-centric playboy that fans like to imagine.  It’s far more likely that he was well-spoken, funny, charming, and a great dancer.  Remember, Bucky was from the lower classes, so he wouldn’t have had the money - despite the Depression, it was expected that men pay for the entire date (barring Sadie Hawkins themed events and once a couple started to go steady) - to impress women with a car and fancy clothes, nor would he have been able to take them out to dinner, so his dance skills would have been pretty important!  

In fact, dancing was such a popular form of entertainment that, in one year, the University of Michigan fraternities held over 300 evening dances!

According to this web page “young people in the 1930s dated and double-dated by going to movies, getting something to eat, going for ice cream, driving around, spending time with friends, going to dances, and even ‘necking.’”  That’s right folks, necking.  Not fucking.  

image

Women were expected to straddle a fine line between being too forward or too “frigid,” both of which could harm their reputations.  Young people engaged in kissing, necking, and petting (meaning anything short of full intercourse).  Petting was becoming more common - due, in part, to rising automobile-culture - as was sex itself; heavier petting typically came from going-steady, and engagement “came… to mean that partners would at some point ‘go all the way’” (Teen Culture in the 1930’s).  Ladies who were known to be free with their sexuality prior to commitment were in danger of being known for exactly that, and could easily become popular merely as a means to an end (the wrong kind of popularity).

So, it likely wouldn’t have been hard for Bucky, as a popular young man, to find a willing partner (and I’m certainly not suggesting that he was virginal).  However, if he were the sort of man to focus on easy women, it’s not likely that he would maintain his own high rating (which, again, we can guess at by the fact that he was able to not only secure himself dates, but Steve as well).  

This is a really quick and dirty run-down of dating and sex during the 30’s into the early 40’s, but there is a lot of information available out there.  Bucky is presented as a stand-up guy, so I don’t really understand why so many people seem to view him as some sort of a man whore.  I sincerely doubt that he was entirely chaste (particularly once he went into the Army, a topic which I avoided on purpose), but I imagine that he was a desirable companion for his charm and dateability far more than for his sexual prowess.


 
Okay so I've created a society where being trans or non-binary or bi-gendered isn't super common but has no stigma/weirdness. My MC has grown up in this society and is cisgendered, but one of the friends she makes is a transgirl. I want readers to know that she's trans, but without making a big deal of it or resorting to a dumb "reveal". Do you have any suggestions of a good way to do this? Thanks.
Anonymous

clevergirlhelps:

  • The trans girl mentions stuffing a bra, tucking, etc.
  • The trans girl’s parents/relatives have baby pictures of her dressed as a boy and she wishes they would take them down
  • The trans girl encourages someone to fight their fate because people are not what they are assigned at birth
  • The trans girl discusses her experiences as a trans girl - even if being trans has no stigma, she probably had a different (not in a bad way) life than a cis girl

 

lustik:

27,9 - 2012 - Thale Vangen - ANNAELLEGALLERY


 
icarus   

"Please tell a story about a girl who gets away."

I would, even if I had to adapt one, even if I had to make one up just for her. “Gets away from what, though?”

“From her fairy godmother. From the happy ending that isn’t really happy at all. Please have her get out and run off the page altogether, to somewhere secret where words like ‘happy’ and ‘good’ will never find her.”

“You don’t want her to be happy and good?”

“I’m not sure what’s really meant by happy and good. I would like her to be free. Now. Please begin."

White is for Witching, Helen Oyeyemi (via sebastianmoran)

(via yetanotherplayer)